From Teach to Preach

When I think of teachers I usually think in terms of extremes. To use the 1996 children’s movie, Matilda, as an example, I picture either the “Ms. Honey” character or the “Ms. Trunchbull” character, no in-betweens. However, if we roam away from the Hollywood portrayal of teachers, we find that there are several “in-between” teaching styles.

Being a person who has grown up loving nearly all of her teachers and forming close relationships with many of them, I was slightly shocked when I came to Baylor out of high school and did not have the opportunity to create a personal bond with all of my instructors. Although it depends on the teacher, our classrooms, big or small, are not always set up for close teacher-student relationship in the collegiate setting. It sometimes feels like we are being preached at rather than taught. Why does the focus change from forming relationships with teachers in high school to being more formal in college?

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3 thoughts on “From Teach to Preach

  1. I have always wondered why the change happens from high school to college in regards to relationships with teachers. I have always had close relationships with my teachers until I got to Baylor and I wondered if it was because of the big lecture style classes or just because the teachers didn’t necessarily care. It wasn’t until I started taking more major classes that I saw the teachers become interested in their students.

  2. It is definitely a strange transition between high school and college. Before coming to Baylor several people told me that Baylor would be a great school if I wanted to be able to have personal interaction with professors, but like Laura said this wasn’t really something I saw until I got into more upper level major classes. I think this is a result of both students not being as interested in huge introductory classes and teachers not wanting to get to know students that they will never have in class or see again.

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